Concussion & Brain Injuries in Canadian Children and Youth

Top 5 Sports and Recreational Activities Responsible for Concussion and Other Brain Injury Related Hospital Visits

Concussions and other head injuries are more common in some sports and recreational activities than others. Many sports-related head injuries including concussions are preventable - it’s about playing smart and limiting the risk of head injuries while being active. Even so, when this type of injury occurs, its short- and long-term consequences can be severe, especially for children and youth. With proper prevention, early detection and care, risks can be minimized.

What is this?

This open-source tool is an interactive snapshot of brain injury statistics. It shows the most common sports and recreational activities related to concussions and other brain injuries among Canadian children and youth, 5-19 years old (2012-2014).

How does it work?

The default mode (with all boxes except 'Other' checked) shows:

  1. the top five sports related to concussions and other brain injuries for each age group/sex
  2. the total numbera of injuries per group in the centre of each chart
  3. the percentageb of injuries associated to each sport in the segments of each chart

You can use the Controls (relative size and accessibility view) to change your display, as well as the legend to customize what you want to see. The ‘other’ category (sports or recreational activities that are not within the top five) is not displayed by default but can be added by clicking on the associated check box. You can also download and view the dataset.

What do you want to see?
Controls Download (.csv)
Relative Size Help Icon
Accessibility View Help Icon
Male Female
Ages 5-9

Ages 5-9

Male

Ages 5-9

Female

Hidden
Ages 10-14

Ages 10-14

Male

Ages 10-14

Female

Hidden
Ages 15-19

Ages 15-19

Male

Ages 15-19

Female

Hidden

Highlights

Injuries reported may be fully or partially explained by participation levels in sport, or reporting to emergency rooms, and are not necessarily due to an inherent danger/risk of the sport. Be active. Play smart.

Notes

  • The Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP) is an emergency department (ED)-based injury and poisoning surveillance system operating in 16 sites across Canada. It collects patients' accounts of pre-event injury circumstances (narratives of "what went wrong") using the Injury/Poisoning Reporting form, and additional clinical data about the injured person. The CHIRPP comprises a sample of Canada's hospital emergency departments, so the data should not be used to draw conclusions about injury patterns across the entire Canadian population.
  • a A small percentage of cases are still being entered into the system, counts are proportional estimates.
  • b As a proportion of all sports and Recreation-Related TBIs for the same age and sex.
  • Children's Active Games: Includes tag, hide and seek, Red Rover, Playing Ball, tree-climbing.
  • CHIRPP: Visit CHIRPP's web page.

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