Data Blog

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How Healthy are Canadians?

How Healthy are Canadians?

Being healthy means different things for different people. However, most of us would agree that it involves a sense of mental and physical well-being. Many factors influence our health, such as our genes, our lifestyles and our environment, to name a few. Health is a state of being but also a resource for everyday life. So, how healthy are Canadians? To find out, we examined health data...

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Down Syndrome Day – March 21

Down Syndrome Day – March 21

Down syndrome, a chromosomal abnormality, is one of the most common congenital anomalies (or birth defects) worldwide. Most diagnoses are made by birth or within the first year after birth. Children with Down syndrome present with well-defined physical characteristics. They often experience intellectual delay and are at an increased risk for several medical conditions...

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The connection between childhood maltreatment and diabetes

A Canadian look at the connection between childhood maltreatment and diabetes

Child abuse may hurt the body for years after it ends. Reducing child abuse, then, will not only reduce immediate pain, injury and suffering, but may also improve adults’ long-term physical health. Child maltreatment, including physical and sexual abuse and...

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Cancer in Canada

Cancer in Canada

Cancer is a disease that develops when abnormal cells grow and divide in an uncontrolled way, forming lumps or tumours that can invade nearby tissues or spread to other parts of the body. The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) monitors national cancer trends using data from the Canadian Cancer Registry (CCR)...

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Positive Mental Health in Canada

Positive Mental Health in Canada

Positive mental health is the capacity to feel, think, and act in ways that enhance the ability to enjoy life and deal with challenges. It is a positive sense of emotional and spiritual well-being that respects the importance of culture, equity, social justice, interconnections and personal dignity. Almost two-thirds (65%) of Canadians aged 18 years and older self-rate...

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Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep (PASS): A New Way of Tracking Healthy Daily Activity

Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep (PASS): A New Way of Tracking Healthy Daily Activity

We live our days on a 24 hour cycle. Most of that time is spent in intervals of physical activity, sedentary behaviour (like sitting and screen time) and sleeping. As such, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) recognized that it needed to modernize how it monitors the physical activity levels of Canadians...

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Concussion & Brain Injuries in Canadian Children and Youth

Concussion & Brain Injuries in Canadian Children and Youth

This open-source tool is an interactive snapshot of brain injury statistics. It shows the most common sports and recreational activities related to concussions and other brain injuries among Canadian children and youth, 5-19 years old (2012-2014). Concussions and other head injuries are more common in some sports and recreational...

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Diabetes in Canada

Diabetes in Canada

Diabetes is a common chronic condition that affects Canadians of all ages. It occurs when the body loses its ability to produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that controls sugar levels in the blood. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. If left uncontrolled, diabetes results in high blood sugar levels, which can lead to serious complications. Fortunately...

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Childhood Cancer Month

Childhood Cancer Month

The Cancer in Young People in Canada (CYP-C) program is a national childhood cancer system that was launched in 2009 to contribute to cancer control in all children living with cancer in Canada. It includes 97% of all children aged up to 14 years who have been diagnosed with cancer in Canada (Mitra D et al., 2015). For more information, please visit the program website...

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World Suicide Prevention Day

World Suicide Prevention Day

Suicide is a significant public health issue. The grief and trauma associated with suicide produce long-term costs to society and devastating effects on families, friends and communities. Suicide is a complex problem involving biological, psychological, social and spiritual factors; yet is preventable by knowledge, care and compassion. If you or anyone you know needs to talk to someone...

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Hospital Births in Canada

Hospital Births in Canada

Although some births occur in homes and birthing centres, most births in Canada still take place in hospitals. Here are some interesting statistics on hospital births in 2014 in Canada (excluding Quebec), according to the Canadian Institute for Health Information’s Hospital Discharge Abstract Database (CIHI-DAD). O Canada! July had the most births (26,488) in 2014. The highest number of...

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Healthy Weights in Canadian Children

Healthy Weights in Canadian Children

Obesity means having too much body fat and can negatively affect a child's health and well-being. An obese child will likely become an obese adult. Obesity in adulthood has been linked to many conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, cancer and poor emotional health. Over the last 35 years, obesity rates among Canadian children and youth aged 6-17 years have...

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Mood & Anxiety Disorders in Canada

Mood & Anxiety Disorders in Canada

Mood and anxiety disorders are the most common types of mental illnesses, and they affect Canadians of all ages. So what’s the difference? Mood disorders are characterized by the lowering or elevation of a person’s mood and include major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, dysthymic disorder and perinatal/postpartum depression. Anxiety disorders include excessive...

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Family Violence in Canada

Family Violence in Canada

The Public Health Agency of Canada recognizes family violence as a public health issue, associated with increased risk of negative mental and physical health outcomes. Family violence is any form of abuse or neglect that a child or adult experiences from a family member, or from someone with whom they have an intimate relationship. It is an abuse of power by...

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National Multiple Births Day (May 28)

National Multiple Births Day (May 28)

Multiple births mean the birth of more than one baby at a time: a birth of twins, triplets, or more! As unique as these births are, they also face more challenges: higher risk of premature birth, low birth weight and neonatal death (meaning death before a child is one month old). Due to a greater risk of abnormal cognitive development and learning disabilities, multiple birth...

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Mental Health Awareness Week (May 2-8)

Mental Health Awareness Week (May 2-8)

Positive mental health is the capacity of people to feel, think, and act in ways that enhance the ability to enjoy life and deal with challenges. It is a positive sense of emotional and spiritual well-being that respects the importance of culture, equity, social justice, interconnections and personal dignity. Positive mental health can be measured through...

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Sedentary Behaviour in Children and Youth: A New Health Risk

Sedentary Behaviour in Children and Youth: A New Health Risk

Did you know? Activities that require very little movement, that involve sitting or reclining, are called sedentary behaviours. Among children, common sedentary behaviours include sitting while watching TV, playing on the computer or iPad, or texting. Excessive time spent being sedentary is linked to poor health in children and youth, no matter how active they are...

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Parkinson's Awareness Month

Parkinson's Awareness Month

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder. It results from the progressive loss of dopamine-producing cells in the brain. Dopamine is a chemical that carries signals between nerves in the brain and controls the body’s movements. Decreasing amounts of dopamine to the brain can lead to the four main symptoms of Parkinson’s disease: development of tremors, rigidity and...

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Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Cancer is a disease that occurs when the body’s cells do not develop, function and reproduce normally resulting in lumps or tumours that can invade nearby tissues or spread to other parts of the body. Colorectal cancer is a malignant tumour that starts in the cells of the colon or rectum, most often in the cell walls that line them. The colon and rectum are parts of the large intestine and...

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Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias in Canada

Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias in Canada

Diseases and injuries that affect the nervous system (the brain, spinal cord and nerves) are known as neurological conditions. Dementia - the most common of these conditions - is caused by the loss of brain cells and the breakdown of important nerve connections, leading to loss of mental functions. Symptoms can include: memory loss...

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Head Injuries in Children and Youth

Head Injuries in Children and Youth – The Invisible Epidemic

You might have noticed that head injuries in sport have received a lot of attention lately, and this type of injury is now recognized as a public health problem. In some sports, head injuries are common and their potential short- and long-term consequences can be severe. The Minister of Health has committed to support a national strategy to raise...

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Osteoporosis Awareness Month – Exposing The Bone Thief

Osteoporosis — the bone thief — is a common bone disease and with the aging Canadian population, the number of people affected is expected to increase. It occurs when the loss of bone tissue is faster than normal, causing it to become weak and break (fracture) easily. Often people are not aware they have osteo...

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Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

The Public Health Agency of Canada is working closely with provincial and territorial (P/T) partners in the development of a National Autism Surveillance System (NASS). NASS will provide estimates for ASD prevalence (existing cases) and incidence (new diagnosed cases), compare patterns regionally, nationally and internationally, and work towards identifying potential risk factors...

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National Drowning Prevention Week

Summertime is about taking almost every indoor activity and doing it outside. It also means finding ways to stay cool. While many of us enjoy a good swim, it’s an activity that requires much safety. Does drowning mean death? Well, not always. Based on the World Health Organization’s definition, drowning is defined as respiratory impairment from being in or under a liquid...

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Mental Illness in Canada

Mental illnesses have a significant impact on the health of Canadians as well as the Canadian economy, including our health and social care systems. The Report from the Canadian Chronic Disease Surveillance System: Mental Illness in Canada, 2015, is the first national report to use linked administrative health data (physician billing and hospitalization records), for the surveillance of mental illness...

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